pediatric nurse practitioner

Role of the pediatric nurse practitioner in promoting breastfeeding for late preterm infants in primary care settings

The preterm birth rate has been increasing steadily during the past two decades. Up to two thirds of this increase has been attributed to the increasing rate of late preterm births (34 to < 37 gestational weeks). The advantages of breastfeeding for premature infants appear to be even greater than for term infants; however, establishing breastfeeding in late-preterm infants is frequently more problematic.

Because of their immaturity, late preterm infants may have less stamina; difficulty with latch, suck, and swallow; temperature instability; increased vulnerability to infection; hyperbilirubinemia, and more respiratory problems than the full-term infant.

Late preterm infants usually are treated as full term and discharged within 48 hours of birth, so pediatric nurse practitioners in primary care settings play a critical role in promoting breastfeeding through early assessment and detection of breastfeeding difficulties and by providing anticipatory guidance related to breastfeeding and follow-up.

The purpose of this article is to describe the developmental and physiologic immaturity of late preterm infants and to highlight the role of pediatric nurse practitioners in primary care settings in supporting and promoting breastfeeding for late preterm infants.

infants, breastfeeding, pediatric, nurse, practitioner

State of the science on postpartum depression: what nurse researchers have contributed

Postpartum depression has been described as a thief that steals motherhood. It can result in tragedy and sometimes in headline-gripping maternal suicide or infanticide. Because one of the highest priorities for nursing is to continually advance the knowledge that underlies nursing practice, it is essential that we understand what nurse researchers have done to advance the knowledge base of postpartum depression. This integrative review is a two-part series for MCN that summarizes 141 postpartum depression studies conducted by nurse researchers from around the globe, including United States, Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong, Taiwan), Finland, Iceland, Sweden, Turkey, and Malaysia. Specific areas of postpartum depression to which nurse researchers have devoted their primary attention include epidemiology, risk factors, transcultural perspectives, instrument development, screening, interventions, and mother-infant interactions.

This two-part series summarizes 141 postpartum depression studies that have been conducted by nurse researchers from around the globe. Part 1 addressed the contributions of nurse researchers in the areas of epidemiology, risk factors, and transcultural perspectives related to postpartum depression. Part 2 describes what nurse researchers have contributed to the following aspects of postpartum depression: instrumentation/screening, interventions, mother-infant interactions, family dynamics, breastfeeding, preterm births, biological factors, clinicians’ knowledge, and mothers’ use of health services.

Sources:

Ahmed AH. Role of the pediatric nurse practitioner in promoting breastfeeding for late preterm infants in primary care settings. J Pediatr Health Care. 2010;24(2):116-122. doi:10.1016/j.pedhc.2009.03.005

Beck CT. State of the Science on postpartum depression: what nurse researchers have contributed–part 1. MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2008;33(2):121-126. doi:10.1097/01.NMC.0000313421.97236.cf

Beck CT. State of the science on postpartum depression: what nurse researchers have contributed-part 2. MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2008;33(3):151-158. doi:10.1097/01.NMC.0000318349.70364.1c